The official journal of The Sri Lanka Veterinary Association
Antimicrobial resistance patterns of faecal E. coli and Salmonella in wild animals in eastern wildlife region of Sri Lanka
Journal - Sri Lanka Veterinary Journal (volume: 66(2))
Volume - 66(2)
Year - 2019
Page Number - 21
Download Article as PDF Download Full Journal as PDF
Original Article

S.L. Vet.J. 2019, 66 (2) 21-28
Original article

http://doi.org/10.4038/slvj.v66i2.45

ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE PATTERNS OF FAECAL E. coli AND Salmonella
IN WILD ANIMALS IN EASTERN WILDLIFE REGION OF SRI LANKA

Nihal Pushpakumara Don Bamunusinghage1*, Kottawattage Sanda Arunika Kottawatta2,
Preeni Abeynayake2 and Ruwani Sagarika Kalupahana2

1 Department of Wildlife Conservation, Sri Lanka, 2 Department of Veterinary Public Health and
Pharmacology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of Peradeniya, Sri
Lanka

Summary: Resistance to antimicrobials is a worldwide problem in both human and veterinary medicine. Exposure to antimicrobials is commonly attributed to the maintenance of resistance in bacterial populations. Commensals like Escherichia coli (E. coli) can easily acquire and transfer resistance genes. The present study was conducted to identify antimicrobial resistance (AMR) profiles of E. coli and Salmonella isolated from faecal samples of wild animals. During the period of December 2015 to June 2016, samples were collected from 26 birds, 25 mammals and three reptiles within the Eastern Wildlife Health Region of Sri Lanka, which covers approximately 125,576 hectares. Isolation rates of E. coli and Salmonella from faecal samples were 37.03% (20/54) and 18.51% (10/54) respectively. Nine of the 20 E. coli isolates (45%) were resistant to ampicillin and 7 (35%) to trimethoprim+sulfamethoxazole and tetracycline. Two E. coli isolates were resistant to more than 6 antimicrobials tested. All 20 E. coli isolates were susceptible to amikacin and imipenem and 19 (95%) were susceptible to ceftriaxone and gentamicin. Out of the 10 Salmonella isolates, four were resistant to ampicillin and tetracycline, while 2 were resistant to trimethoprim+sulfamethoxazole. Ten percent resistance was observed against each nalidixic acid, streptomycin, and ciprofloxacin. Multiple Drug Resistant (MDR, i.e. not susceptible to at least one agent in at least three antimicrobial classes) E. coli and Salmonella were recovered from Jungle Cat (Felis chaus), Jungle Fowl (Gallus lafayetti), and Serpent Eagle (Spilornis cheela). These AMR and MDR patterns indicate a threat to wildlife and the necessity of conducting a detailed study to identify the possible sources of wildlifecontamination.

*Corresponding author: Nihal Pushpakumara, e-mail: npkumara29@gmail.com

How to Cite: Don Bamunusinghage, N.P., Arunika Kottawatta, K.S., Abeynayake, P. and Kalupahana, R.S., 2019. Antimicrobial resistance patterns of faecal E. coli and Salmonella in wild animals in eastern wildlife region of Sri Lanka. Sri Lanka Veterinary Journal, 66(2), pp.21–28. DOI: http://doi.org/10.4038/slvj.v66i2.45

Keywords: