The official journal of The Sri Lanka Veterinary Association
Sri Lanka Veterinary Journal (volume: 63(2))
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Volume - 63(2)
Year - 2016
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Section - A
Review Article
Indira Silva1
1. Veterinary Teaching Hospital, University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka

Not available for this review article. Please download the fulltext for details.

Original Article
K .A.N. Wijayawardhane1,  K.G.S.S. Karunathilake2  and  V.S.S Kumara3
1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka
2. Beloved Animal Hospital, 264/4, Miriswatta, Sri Lanka
3. Provincial Director's Office, Department of Animal Production and Health, Mannar, Sri Lanka

Summary: Healthy dogs usually excrete small amounts of protein in urine. Persistently high proteinuria is usually a marker of kidney disease. The urinary protein : creatinine ratio (UPC) is used in quantifying urine protein excretion in order to diagnose kidney diseases, guiding recommendations for monitoring and treatment of kidney diseases and evaluation of prognosis. However, use of UPC ratio has not been well established/ used to diagnose renal diseases in dogs in Sri Lanka. Therefore, for the first time in Sri Lanka, we used this method to detect UPC ratio of healthy dogs (n=51). Once we established the UPC ratios of healthy dogs, UPC ratios were measured in working dogs (n=45) in Kennels Division of Sri Lanka Police, since renal diseases are a common cause of mortality in these dogs. In control group, the mean UPC ratio was 0.06±0.05. This was similar to the UPC ratio of tracking group among working dogs. Two out of 22 dogs used for explosive duties had UPC ratio within the borderline proteinuric stage (0.2-0.5) according to the staging system implemented by the International Renal Interest Society (IRIS). In the narcotic group 2 out of 12 dogs were borderline proteinuric and one dog was proteinuric. In this study, we have successfully established the measurement of UPC ratio to detect proteinuria in Sri Lankan dogs and have identified dogs that are susceptible to renal diseases.

M. Jagatheesan1,  D.D.N de Siva2  and  H.M.H.S Ariyarathna1
1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, University of Peradeniya
2. Department of Veterinary clinical Science, University of Peradeniya

SUMMARY: Obesity is a severe health issue among companion dogs. It may seriously impair the quality of a dog's life predisposing to many other disease conditions. Incorrect assessment of the body condition (BC) of their pets by the dog owners has been identified as an obstacle which would prevent early intervention in canine obesity. This study was designed to assess the degree of agreement between the dog owner's perception of their pet's BC and the scientific assessment of body condition score (BCS). Eighty-two large pure bred dogs were included in the study. Scientific evaluation was performed using 1-5 BCS system proposed by Royal Canin™ (1-emmaciated, 2- thin, 3-ideal, 4-over weight, 5- obese). Following the scientific evaluation the owners were asked to assess their pet's BC using a grading system which included appropriate lay terms to describe the 1-5 scoring positions in the scientific method (1=very thin, 2=thin, 3=ideal, 4=fat, 5=very fat). In addition the knowledge of necessity of feeding adjustments and exercise, health risk of obesity and awareness of scientific BC evaluation methods were evaluated using a short questionnaire. Agreement between the owner's perception and scientific method was analyzed using Fleiss' kappa test. Misperception occurred among 31.71% (26/82) of the owners and there was only a fair agreement (K=0.374321, P<0.05) between two evaluation methods. Interestingly owner misperception about the body condition existed not only in the BCS=4/ Overweight and BCS=5/ Obese groups but also in BCS=2 / Thin group as well. Despite the good knowledge on health risk of obesity and need of exercise among the owners, under estimation was common in BCS=4/ Overweight (40%, 8/20) and BCS =5/ Obese (100%, 5/5) groups which might be a sequela to owner's misperception. In the BCS=2/ Thin group there was a prominent overestimation 3/5 (60%). Only 12.1% of the owners were aware of existence of scientific body condition evaluation methods. Current findings are suggestive of the importance of modifying the owner's perception about their pet's body condition and the necessity of the adequate veterinary intervention through client communication about pet feeding and exercising.

Clinical Communication
D. R. A. Dissanayake1,  I. D. Silva1,  Sashikala Gamage1,  Dinuka Sonnadara2,  M.R.B.N. Bandara3,  S. S. Alokabandara3,  V.P. Priyanka Jayapani1  and  Waruni Jayaweera4
1. Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya
2. National Zoological Garden, Dehiwala, Sri Lanka
3. National Zoological Garden, Pinnawala, Sri Lanka
4. Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Animal Science, University of Peradeniya

Summary: Not avialable for this clinical communication. Please download the fulltext for details.

K.K. Sumanasekera1,  M.G.C.M. Jayasinghe1,  K.G. Indika1,  R.E.H. Perera1  and  D.D.N. de Silva2
1. Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of Peradeniya
2. Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Department of Veterinary Clinical Science, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of Peradeniya

SUMMARY: Forty five pet rabbits of different breeds with various clinical conditions were presented to the VTH from January 2014 to March 2016 reflecting an emerging trend in companion animal ownership and health concerns. Of these cases, Psoroptic mange was the commonest disease condition while traumatic injuries (26.7%) including dog bite wounds, fractures, eye conditions were regularly encountered. Chemical trauma and infectious diseases (17.8%) namely, ulcerative pododermatitis, respiratory tract and urinary tract infections; miscellaneous cases such as floppy rabbit syndrome, heat stress, nutritional deficiency and prolapsed vagina were also presented. The objective of this communication is to make the veterinary practitioners aware of the common health conditions encountered in pet rabbits and how those were treated and managed.

Section - B
Reports
Umanga C. Gunasekera1,  Mahalingam Muralithas2  and  Maximilian P.O. Baumann3
1. Department of Animal Production and Health, Sri Lanka
2. Department of Animal Production and Health, Sri Lanka; Postgraduate Studies in International Animal Health, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Freie Universitat Berlin, Germany
3. Postgraduate Studies in International Animal Health, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Freie Universitat Berlin, Germany

Summary: Not available for this report. Please download the fulltext for details.

BCG Mendis1  and  A.Dangolla2
1. Division of Bio resources, Research Center for Zoonosis Control, Hokkaido University, Japan
2. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya

Summary: Human- monkey conflict is often reported due to deforestation and increasing human population with their needs. This study summarises the findings of most of the work done in this regard from the year 2000 to 2016. Largely individual monkeys and/or individual lonely mothers with young ones and secondly the troupes of monkeys cause conflicts within Kandy municipal area. Red faced monkeys prefer human food, home garden produce and insects found in and around houses. In addition to being a menace, these monkeys, carry some potentially zoonotic enteric pathogens. The methods launched to control this conflict were tested such as capturing, sterilizing and translocating or rehabilitating and use of repelling devices to change monkeys' trails. The castration, and ovario hysterectomy on a portion of the troop in reducing their numbers needs debate. A completely monkey proof garbage disposal system is also a must.

Letter to the Editor
H.A.S.I. Harischandra1
1. Government Veterinary Surgeon, Department of Animal Production and Health, Veterinary Office,Nawagatthegama, Sri Lanka

Summary: Not available for this letter to the editor. Pleaase download the PDF for details.

T. M. S. K. Piyadasa , A. Dangolla, C. Rajapakshe1  and   E. Rajapakshe, N. Horadagoda, P. G. A. Pushpakumara, P. Windsor 1
1. Departments of Veterinary Clinical Science, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka

Summary: Not available for this letter to the editor. Pleaase download the PDF for details.