The official journal of The Sri Lanka Veterinary Association
Sri Lanka Veterinary Journal (volume: 48(1))
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Volume - 48(1)
Year - 2001
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Section - A
Original Article
M.Dileepan1,  N.U. Horadagoda2,  T.G. Wijewardena3  and  I.V.P. Dharmawardena4
1. Veterinary Research Institute, Peradeniya
2. Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of Peradeniya
3. Veterinary Research Institute, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka
4. Colombo Municipal Abattoir, Colombo 08, Sri Lanka


AN ABATTOIR STUDY ON THE AETIO-PATHOLOGY OF LUNG LESIONS IN PIGS IN SRI LANKA

M. Dileepan1 B.V.Sc., N.U. Horadagoda2 B.V.Sc., Ph.D., T.G. Wijewardana1 B.V.Sc., Ph.D. and

I.V.P. Dharmawardena3 B.V.Sc.

1Veterinary Research Institute, Peradeniya, 2Department of Veterinary Pathobiology,

Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya

3 Colombo Municiple council Abattoir, Colombo 08

Respiratory tract infections in pigs are often reported in Sri Lanka, but there has been no systematic investigation to identify the aetio-pathology of these diseases.  Hence, an abattoir survey was conducted to obtain baseline information on pulmonary lesions. A total of 81 pigs managed either on an intensive (61) or extensive system (20), slaughtered at ColomboMunicipal Abattoir were examined for lung lesions during a 3-month period in 1998.  Pneumonic lesions were found in 43%(35/81) of lungs examined.  Macroscopically, lesions were largely confined to the cranioventral region of lungs.  On morphologic classification, 18 affected lungs (18/35) showed histological changes of bronchopneumonia caused by mycoplasma, in which there was characteristics perivascular and peribronchiolar lymphocytic hyperplasia, together with alveolar infiltration of lymphocytes and macrophages.  Two lungs had embolic pneumonia and one was identified as interstitial pneumonia.  On an aetiologic classification, parasitic pneumonia due to Metastrongylus species was found in eight lungs (23%).  Six (17%) of the affected lungs had lesions of both broncho- and parasitic- pneumonia.  Pasteurella multocida was the predominant (43%) organism isolated from pneumonic lesions.  Streptococcus spp., Klebsiella spp., Staphulococcus spp and Escherichia coli were the other organisms frequently isolated.  The pulmonary consolidation scores were higher in the lungs with P. multocida infection.  There was no statistically significant association between the prevalence of the types of pneumonia and the systems of management (P>0.05).  This study has, for the first time, provided histological evidence of mycoplasmal pneumonia of pigs inSri Lanka. 

 S.L.Vet.J. 2001, 48(1A): 1-8

D.A. Gamage1
1. Government Veterinary Office, Kamburupitiya, Sri Lanka

APPLICATION OF PROBLEM CENSUS AND PROBLEM SOLVING (PC/PS) TECHNIQUE TO IDENTIFY CONSTRAINTS OF DAIRY FARMERS: A CASE STUDY IN KAMBURUPITIYA VETERINARY RANGE

 D.A. Gamage, B.V.Sc. 

Government Veterinary Office, Kamburupitiya

 This study was initiated to identify constraints faced by dairy farmers in the Ransegoda agrarian services division and the weaknesses of existing extension methods adopted by extension officers and to suggest appropriate measures to maintain the industry as a viable enterprise. The core problems identified, ranked in order of importance were the inadequacy of feeds, non-availability of improved cattle breeds, insufficient income, difficulties in access to government organizations and lack of knowledge.  Among the solutions to the feed problem as perceived by farmers were: the incorporation of high yielding grass varieties in farms, supplementation of grass with legumes, fodder and urea treated straw. Upgrading of cattle through Artificial Insemination (AI) was suggested as the answer to non-availability of improved breeds.  Adulteration, negative attitudes of the consumers, unhygienic conditions and availability of powdered milk were recognized as contributory factors that have contributed to the lowering of consumer demand for fresh milk.  Solutions suggested to ease this problem were production of quality milk, value addition and introduction of fresh milk to school canteens. The establishment of farmer organizations was highlighted as a means of obtaining higher prices for milk through organized delivery of milk, collected from the producers at village level to the near-by collecting centers.  These organizations could also arrange to obtain extension services from the limited number of officers at field level.  It was pointed out that knowledge associated with cattle rearing was inadequate among the dairy farmers.  An imbalance between the affluent and the resource poor farmers in terms of service provision was also identified.  It was also revealed that existing demonstration farms were not properly utilized for training activities.  Training should be designed according to farmer needs.

S.L.Vet.J. 2001, 48(1A): 9-11

Short Communication
Enoka P Boyagoda1,  Indira D. Silva2  and  A. Dangolla3
1. Department of Veterinary Clincal Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine & Animal Science, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya
2. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, University of Peradeniya
3. Department of Veterinary Clinical Science, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine & Animal Science, University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka

ORNAMENTAL FISH REARING IN SRI LANKA.

I. BASIC INFORMATION ON ORNAMENTAL FISH KEEPING FOR THE PRACTICING LOCAL VETERINARIAN

 Enoka P. Boyagoda, B.V.Sc., Indira Silva, B.V.Sc., Ph.D. and Ashoka Dangolla B.V.Sc., Ph.D.

 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science,

University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya

 Descriptive information from 30 personal interviews with ornamental fish keepers in Central and Western provinces is presented.  A pre-tested questionnaire consisting of 15 open-ended questions was administered during July 1996 to June 1997.

            The gold fish (Carassius auratus) was the most commonly reared species (76%) and carp (Cyprinus carpio) was the preferred species by those who reared fish in ponds.  The popular sources of fish were commercial aquaria and breeders.  Water for the fish was largely from the domestic supply and tap water users dechlorinated the water before using in ponds.  Most respondents (63%) quarantined newly purchased fishes by equalizng the water temperature or pre treating the water with various chemicals before they were introduced into ponds.  Regular testing of water quality was not a common practice, though all were aware of the need to maintain quality water.  Under gravel water filter was the most popular type of filter among the fish tank keepers, and most respondents (80%) preferred natural plants than artificial plants.  Commercially available floating pellets and flakes were the commonly used feed (77%), and the others used natural feed and kitchen left-overs as feed.  White spots, fin/tail rot, gill flukes and fungal infections were the most common fish diseases reported.  Unavailability of equipment and lack of veterinary support were the common constraints reported.

S.L.Vet.J. 2001, 48(1A): 13-15

M.Dileepan1,  N.U. Horadagoda2,  T.G. Wijewardena3  and  Kristy M Townsend4
1. Veterinary Research Institute, Peradeniya
2. Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of Peradeniya
3. Veterinary Research Institute, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka
4. Veterinary Pathology and Anatomy, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072 Queensland, Australia

SCREENING FOR TOXIGENIC PASTEURELLA MULTOCIDA AMONG ISOLATES RECOVERED FROM TONSILS AND LUNGS OF PIGS

 M.Dileepan1 B.V.Sc., T.G. Wijewardana1 B.V.Sc., Ph.D. N.U. Horadagoda2 B.V.Sc., Ph.D. and Kirsty M. Townsend3 Ph.D

1Veterinary Research Institute, Peradeniya, 2Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of Peradeniya

3Veterinary Pathology and Anatomy, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072 Queensland, Australia

 

Eighty-five isolates of Pasteurella multocida recovered from the tonsils and lungs of pigs during and abattoir study were screened for toxigenic strains of the organism by mouse inoculation, ELISA and PCR.  None of the isolates examined by the three methods were positive for the presence of toxin-producing Pasteurella multocida.  The findings further support the absence of clinical atrophic rhinitis among pigs in the Western and Northwestern provinces.

 S.L.Vet.J. 2001, 48(1A): 17-19

Section - B
News

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Review Article
H.Abeygunawardena1
1. Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, University of Peradeniya

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Abstracts

Abstract is not available for this item. Please click on Read button to read  online or Download button to download the PDF of proceedings of the 53rd annual scientific sessions.

Reports
R. Hettiarachchi1
1. Department of Animal Production and Health, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka

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