The official journal of The Sri Lanka Veterinary Association
Sri Lanka Veterinary Journal (volume: 50 (1))
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Volume - 50 (1)
Year - 2003
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Section - A
Review Article
Samithamby Jeyaseelan1  and  Samuel K. Maheswaran2
1. Section of Microbial Pathogenesis, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06536, USA
2. Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St.Paul, MN 55108, USA


RECENT ADVANCES IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF  SHIPPING FEVER PNEUMONIA 

Samithamby Jeyaseelanand Samuel K. Maheswaran2

 

1Section of Microbial Pathogenesis, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06536, USA.

2Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St.Paul, MN 55108, USA.

 

Shipping fever pneumonia causes severe economic burden to the beef and dairy cattle industry worldwide.  The bacterium Mannheimia heamolytica has been identified as the primary aetiological agent contributing to the clinical presentation and acute fibrinonecrotizing pneumonia associated with this disease.  Although M. haemolytica possesses several virulence factors including capsule, outer membrane proteins, neuraminidase, fimbriae, lipopolysaccharide, and leukotoxin, several lines of evidence indicate leukotoxine as the primary virulence factor.  This review article focuses on recent advances in the knowledge of the molecular characteristics and mechanisms of action of M. haemolytica leukotoxin as well as its role in the pathogenesis of lung injury in shipping fever pneumonia.  Understanding the role of leukotoxin in the pathogenesis of shipping fever pneumonia is crucial for the development of better treatment and prevention strategies to control this devastating disease. 

S.L. Vet.J.2003, 50(1A): 1-8

Original Article
M.N.M. Ibrahim1,  S.J. Staal1,  S.L.A. Daniel2,  B.K. Ganguly3  and  W. Thorpeeyaseelan1
1. International Livestock Research Institute, P.O. Box 30709, Nairobi, Kenya
2. Ministry of Livestock Development & Estate Infrastructure, St Micheals Road, Colombo 2, Sri Lanka
3. National Dairy Development Board, Anand, India

MILK PROCUREMENT, MARKETS AND CONSUMPTION PATTERNS IN SRI LANKA: APPLICATION OF A DAIRY CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK 

M.N.M. Ibrahim, S.J. Staal1, S.L.A. Daniel2, B.K. Ganguly3 and W. Thorpeeyaseelan1

International Livestock Research Institute, P.O. Box 30709, Nairobi, Kenya 

This study is the first part of a comprehensive appraisal of the Sri Lankan dairy sector.  The methodology employed is based on a Conceptual Framework for Development Oriented Dairy Research that combines different levels of analysis of secondary and primary data for each of the four main components of the sector; consumption, processing, marketing and production.  It centres on the principle that viable dairy systems are necessarily demand-driven, which requires that to achieve an accurate overview, demand and market factors should be assessed at the same time as any examination of farm-level production.  This article thus presents the results of the demand analysis, and is complemented by second article addressing the production results from the same study.  The discussion and the conclusions are based on a combination of secondary information, a Rapid Appraisal (conducted by a team of interdisciplinary researchers), and ad island wide survey conducted in 1999 capturing 3525 households in 20 of the 25 administrative districts in 6 major agro-ecological zones.

The results show that while the per capita consumption of milk and milk products in Sri Lanka is low compared to other countries in South Asia, since 1981 it has grown from 13kg/year to about 36kg.year currently.  Some of this increase consumption has occurred through growth in the informal or local market (28% of the current total) which suggests that formal collection systems are not serving farmers adequately, perhaps because of over-rigid pricing regimes, or because supplies of liquid mild to consumers are inadequate or too expensive or inappropriately marketed.  Even conservative projections indicate future strong increases in demand particularly for liquid mild due to continued GDP growth, which will present good opportunities for domestic smallholder dairy producers.  Currently relatively little milk is retained by producers for home consumption (15%) – most is sold in liquid form (78%) or made into curd/yoghurt (7%), indicating a high degree of market orientation.  The study found that farm-gate milk prices, which were low relative to other countries, were cited as major constraint to increased production.  Formal collection centre price averaged 11.60 Rs/1, while the informal market price averaged 15.20 Rs/1.  On the demand side, only some 30% of households reported consumption of liquid milk, and most of those were dairy producers.  Most households reported a preference for powdered milk, however 15% of households also said that liquid milk was not available.  Results from the household survey suggested that consumption of liquid milk increased with higher income (unlike that of milk powder), suggesting that over time, as incomes grow, demand could shift towards liquid milk.  This shift would strongly favour domestic producers, and efforts towards accelerating that change should be considered.

S.L. Vet.J.2003, 50(1A): 9-20

Short Communication
Chitranjane Thecathasan1
1. Government Veterinary Office, Kolonnawa, Sri Lanka

IMPACT OF DROUGHT ON HEALTH STATUS OF CATTLE IN KATANA VETERINARY SURGEON\\\"S RANGE 

Chitranjane Thecathasan, B.V.Sc., M.Sc.

Government Veterinary Office, Kolonnawa

 

Diseases encountered in cattle during dry and wet seasons in the Katana veterinary range during the period 1999 to 2001 are discussed here.  The effect of drought was significant (p<0.05) on the incidence of vitamin & mineral deficiencies and Ephemeral fever.  Infectious bovine kerato conjunctivitis and cracks/blisters on teats were found only in dry period.  The occurrence of nutritionally related diseases such as, general weakness & recumbency and disorders of newborn calves was high during the dry period compared to the wet period, but the difference was not significant and their occurrence was mostly around the beginning of the wet period.

S.L. Vet.J.2003, 50(1A): 9-20 

Clinical Communication
C.P.L. Fernando1,  N.U. Horadagoda1  and  L.N.A. de Silva2
1. Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine & Animal Science, University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka
2. Department of Farm Animal Production & Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine & Animal Science, University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka

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Short Communication
U.P.R.M. Pathirana1,  P. S. Jayathilake2  and  A. Dangolla1
1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Science, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine & Animal Science, University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka
2. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of Peradeniya

Abstract is not available for this item. Please click on Read button to read  online or Download button to download the PDF of this short communication.

Section - B
News

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Abstracts

Abstract is not available for this item. Please click on Read button to read  online or Download button to download the PDF of proceedings of the 56th annual scientific sessions.